Random Crash Issues Plaguing Google Chromecast Users’ Experience

Numerous Google Chromecast users have claimed to face random crashes on their WiFi networks. The router vendors have acknowledged the pressing issue and are in the process of pushing out patches to ensure seamless user experience. The aggravating issue seems to affect Google Home devices in addition to Chromecast. The problem’s origin lies in Google’s ‘Cast’ feature.

According to NDTV Gadgets 360, TP-Link engineers in an FAQ listing have elucidated that the issue is faced due to multicast DNS (MDNS) packets. High volumes of MDNS are broadcasted, via Google Chromecast and Home, in a short duration of time at tremendous speeds. Conventionally, the MDNS packets get sent out in 20-second intervals. The broadcast is executed when the device is brought out of ‘sleep mode’. This process could possibly surpass over 100,000 packets in a short duration. The size of the packet burst is directly proportional to the amount of time the device is in ‘sleep mode’. This predicament might ultimately cause a router’s prime features to cease from functioning, including wireless connectivity

As per NewsEleven, apart from TP-Link, Netgear and Linksys have also moved forward to release beta firmware updates that mend the connectivity mishaps as a result of Google’s Cast feature. The recent network issues have had more compelling negative consequences. Users on Reddit have confirmed erratic disconnection of the network on all devices connected to the wireless hub that powers their Chromecast. An identical outcome has been discovered with Chromecast Audio as well.

Google Product Forums’ users were initially convinced that the problem occurred particularly with networks powered by the Archer C7. However, TP-Link’s analysis debunked these conclusions with the constructive information they offered.

Sources: NDTV Gadgets 360, NewsEleven

Google vs Amazon: Youtube to be banned from Fire TV and Echo Show

In an escalating spat, Google has decided to terminate YouTube services from Amazon’s Fire TV and Echo Show devices. This decision was taken in the light of Amazon’s refusal to sell some Google products that would serve as a competition to Amazon gadgets. These products included Chromecast, Google’s streaming device seen as an alternative to Fire TV, and Home, an internet- connected speaker which attempts to compete with Amazon’s market-leading Echo .

In a statement given by Google on December 5, it said, “Given this lack of reciprocity, we are no longer supporting YouTube on Echo Show and Fire TV.’’ However, Amazon didn’t instantaneously respond to a request for comment.

Google hopes to pressurise Amazon into selling its products by denying access to the world’s  most extensively viewed video service. YouTube will be taken off  Fire TV on January 1, 2018, unless the two companies agree upon a truce.

YouTube was to be withdrawn from the Echo Show, although Amazon has in the past found methods to formulate unauthorised versions of YouTube available on its device.

Clashes between Google and Amazon have been persistent since the past few years. An initial sign was Amazon redesigning Google’s Android mobile software for its Kindle tablets. Two years ago, Amazon ousted Chromecast from its store, although the device had formerly been its top-selling gadget.

Apart from abjuring Chromecast and the Home speaker from appearing on its store, Amazon has declined to sell an internet-connected thermostat made by Nest, owned by Google parent Alphabet Inc. Amazon also doesn’t permit its Prime video streaming service on Chromecast, an elision that Google seeks to modify.

This spat reflects the contentions that occasionally stir between pay-TV providers and TV networks during re-negotiation of deals. Here, the two aren’t quarrelling over licensing fees. Instead, they are struggling to position their gadgets and digital services into our daily lives as internet-connected appliances become deeply embedded.

Sources:

Bloomberg , The Indian Express