Bangladesh and Myanmar agree on repatriation process of Rohingya Muslims

Dhaka, January 16: Bangladesh and Myanmar have agreed to complete the repatriation of thousands of Rohingya Muslims back to Myanmar within the next two years. Myanmar has agreed to accept 1500 Rohingya each week for the next two years.

Bangladesh and Myanmar foreign ministries informed of the repatriation in a statement issued on January 16. According to the statement, Bangladesh would be setting up five transit camps on either side of the border. Myanmar, in its statement, claimed of building a transit camp with the capacity of housing 30,000 the returning migrants. The repatriation process will be starting from January 23, 2018.

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has raised concerns about forcefully extraditing hundreds of thousands of Rohingya across the border, hoping “that refugees will be able to return home when they themselves choose to.”

While talking in a press conference, UNHCR spokesperson, Andrej Mahecic informed that some major changes need to be overcome to ensure successful repatriation. “These include ensuring that refugees are informed about the situation in their areas of origin and potential return and consulted on their wishes; that their safety is ensured throughout –  on departure, in transit and on return; and that the environment in the areas of return is conducive for safe and sustainable return,” he said.

More than 740,000 Rohingya Muslims had fled to Bangladesh from Rakhine state in Myanmar amidst racial violence in 2016 and 2017. The attacks by Rohingya insurgent on the security posts of Myanmar army had resulted in a fierce military backlash. Around 6700 Rohingya including 730 children were killed in August 2017 alone.

Sources – Reuters , BBC

 

 

 

Burmese Military admits murdering 100 Rohingya Muslims

The Rohingya Muslims, troubled and in an exodus, have been struggling to find their identity and live a peaceful life. In a rare admission of wrongs, the Burmese troops and villagers were behind the killing of a number of Rohingya Muslims, during insurgent attacks at the beginning of September. The bodies were found in a mass grave in Rakhine state’s Inn Din Village, the military’s commander in chief Min Aung Hlaing, said in a statement on Facebook. The local Buddhist villagers had forced the men into a grave they had dug.

In just a few months more than 6,50,000 members of the Rohingya community fled across the border into Bangladesh. The United Nations has branded the actions as ethnic cleansing.Myanmar insists they were carrying a legitimate counterinsurgency operation.

“200 Bengali terrorists attacked using sticks and swords”, which led to a clearance operation in September by the security forces. This statement was made on the Facebook page of its commander-in-chief. The Rohingya Muslims are referred to as Bengalis, which the minority dislikes as it implies they are illegal migrants from Bangladesh.

The statement on the social media page mentions the captives should have been handed over to the police, but the migrants were attacking unceasingly and had destroyed two military vehicles with explosives. The military decided to start killing as according to them situations were out of control. Angry ethnic Rakhine Buddhists wanted to kill the minority and stabbed them after forcing them into a grave on the outskirts of the village. The members of the security forces proceeded to shoot them, the military said.

The statement also affirms strict actions against the villagers and security officials involved in the heinous participation. The extensive investigation has featured the Burmese military condemning their mistakes.

Sources – Washington Post, The Guardian

Myanmar Charges Reuters Reporters under Official Secrets Act

According to reports from The Guardian, two journalists from Reuters have been held by prosecutors in Myanmar on the charge of violating the State’s Official Secrets Act. The lawyers stated that the indictment entails a maximum of 14 years of imprisonment.

The two accused, Wa Lone, 31, and Kyaw Soe Oo, 27, covered the Rohingya Muslims crisis in the western state of Rakhine and reported for Reuters. They were detained on December 12, 2017, during their meeting with a group of police officers over dinner.  The police suspected them of causing security breaches by procuring undisclosed documents from the police. It was the same police officers who were in charge of Rakhine state where the security forces were condemned for human rights violation of the Rohingya Muslims. Their ill-treatment of the Rohingya’s is said resulted in the migration of 650,000 people to Bangladesh.

Than Zaw, the lawyer of the reporters stated that he pled for the immediate bail of his clients. However, the judge said that the request will be reviewed during the next hearing on January 23.  Than Zaw also drew attention to the lack of medical aid given to Wa Lone, who is suffering from a hernia through the course of his detention

Reports from BBC suggested that the government arrested the journalists for illegally possessing secret information with the objective of distributing it to international media. Protesting against this, an army of journalists clad in black, gathered outside the court on January 10th and disputed against the arrest of their colleagues.

In the backdrop of the Rohingya crisis, the civilian government of Myanmar under the leadership of Aung San Suu Kyi, Nobel Peace laureate has been criticized by governments and media groups around the world. The press freedom of the country is questioned in the light of the threats issued to journalists.

Sources – Reuters, Arab News

Lashkar-e-Taiba helps Rakhine Muslims with millions of cash

In what can be termed a propaganda move, Pakistan based Falah-e-Insaniyat Foundation (FIF) i.e. the charity wing of terror group Lashkar-e-Taiba has provided millions of cash in order to help the Rakhine Muslims in need. The cash and the aid materials were distributed to around 300 muslims by FIF volunteers at Cox’s Bazaar refugee camp of Myanmar-fled refugees.

According to sources from the intelligence wing, FIF has been in contact with other Bangladesh-based Islamist groups and has been operating nearby the camp, The Indian Express reported. Foreign Operations head of FIF also mentioned that in spite “extremely risky conditions” the organisation has been able to send relief on time.

As reported by Devoted to Humanity website, the LeT wing has been providing support to the ‘besieged Muslims’ in Rakhine and they plan to expand their support activities throughout Myanmar soon.

The support has also been extended to Arakan Rakhine Salvation Army (ARSA) i.e. the armed wing of Rakhine rebels. ARSA has been engaging in violence against the Armed Forces from Myanmar and it has been ARSA’s incessant killing of Myanmar army officers that led to the recent refugee influx from Rakhine, Myanmar to Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh.

The bone of contention is the unabashed operation of FIF in Pakistan. United Nations and the United States of America has been continuously issuing notices to the organisation and is under scanner for being blacklisted.

Sources: The Indian Express

Aung San Syuu Kyi breaks her silence over communal turmoil in Myanmar

Aung San Suu Kyi in a 30 minute televised speech reached out to the global community for support in a refugee crises that the UN has labelled “ethnic cleansing”, gathering outsiders to help her unite her Nation across ethnic and religious lines.

Communal brutality since August 25 has left hundreds dead and driving more than 410,000 of the Rohingya minority from Myanmar into Bangladesh.

“Despise and dread are the primary scourges of our reality,” she said  “We don’t need Myanmar to be a country isolated by religious convictions or ethnicity”.

While expressing her distress for “all” crowds dislodged by savagery, she said her Nation stood prepared “whenever” to reclaim displaced people subject to a “confirmation” process.

It was not promptly clear what number of the evaluated 410,000 Rohingya who have fled Myanmar would fit the bill to return.

The UN has blamed Myanmar’s armed forces for “ethnic purging” over a campaign of claimed murder and arson that has left scores of Rohingya towns in ash.

The military denies that, demanding its operations are a relative reaction to the late August assaults by Rohingya activists, who they mark as “extremist Bengali terrorists”.

Sources: Reuters, NDTV

Aung San Suu Kyi has a “last chance” to halt military attack: UN

Nobel Peace Prize winner and the de facto leader of Myanmar Aung San Suu Kyi has a “last chance” to halt military attack that is forcing hundreds of thousands of Rohingya to flee abroad, said the United Nations.

After the fresh outbreak of violence at the end of August, over 400,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled western Rakhine state into Bangladesh. On 25thAugust, the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA), an armed rebel group of fighters launched attacks on more than 25 military and boarder police killing a dozen Burmese Security Personnel. Rohingya who fled Myanmar say the militants responded to the ARSA attack with a brutal campaign, burning villages and attacking civilians to drive them out.

United Nations Secretary Antonio Guterres told BBC that unless Aung San Suu Kyi acted now, the tragedy will be absolutely horrible. Guterres’ warning came out after Bangladesh said that it is limiting the movement of more than 400,000 Rohingya who have fled Myanmar. The Bangladeshi police said that Rohingya would not be allowed to travel outside their allocated homes, not even to live with their family.

The Rohingya Crisis is set to appear as a key issue at the UN General Assembly in New York, where world leaders are gathering for meetings. Aung San Suu Kyi is skipping an appearance at the meeting. She claimed that the crisis is being distorted by a huge iceberg of misinformation that is promoting the interest of terrorists.

Sources: BBC, Press 24

Bangladesh charges Myanmar with violating its air space

The Bangladeshi Ministry of Foreign Affairs said on Friday that it had summoned the charge d’affaires of Myanmar’s embassy in Dhaka to complain about a three-time infringement on its airspace in the course of the most recent week.

“Bangladesh strongly protested the instances of violation of airspace by Myanmar military drones and helicopter on 10, 12 and 14 September 2017,” the ministry said in a statement.

“Bangladesh expressed deep concern at the repetition of such acts of provocation and demanded that Myanmar takes immediate measures to ensure that such violation of sovereignty does not occur again,” it added.

Myanmar’s presidential spokesman reacted on Saturday that there was no proof of any trespassing, and that the issue was, be that as it may, being examined.

Ties between the two neighbours soured after Myanmar’s military propelled a fatal crackdown on the minority Rohingya people group in Rakhine State, driving a huge number of Muslims to escape to Bangladesh.

As per most recent assessments, around 391,000 Rohingya people have crossed into Bangladesh since the brutality emitted three weeks prior, making it one of the quickest developing outcast emergencies lately.

Since August 25, the Myanmar military has been assaulting Rohingya Muslims and burning their towns in Rakhine. The assaults have seen a sharp ascent since August 25, following various outfitted assaults on police and military posts in the harried western state.

There have been reports of deaths and ethnic cleansing by Myanmar’s soldiers on the Muslim populace in Rakhine.

Sources: ANI , Business Standard